Two for the Price of One

Two recent news items about the fading of the pandemic in this country converged in my head to emerge as serendipity..  We have spent more than a year in our sweatpants, sitting in front of our computers to work, shop, socialize, and eat. Especially eat.  Being home all the time is dangerous for your resistance to food.. Plus being home all the time is boring, and lonely (or if you have kids, stressful), all of which encourage more shopping online and eating.

So here is Doctor Holley’s prescription for how to do something for yourself and your country at the same time .(Yes, I know, PhDs aren’t empowered to write prescriptions.). This twofer reminds me of the activists who just won seats on Exxon-Mobil’s board, demanding higher profits THROUGH emerging technologies.  Social responsibility and shareholder wealth in the same package? Who knew?

So, what are you being asked to do? Go shopping in real stores. Grocery stores. Clothing stores. Big box stores. Boutiques. Eat at a restaurant.  How does that help you lose the pandemic ten? Or twenty?  Well, in March I started on a new weight loss program that strongly encourages walking, so I have been tracking my steps.  The days I track the most steps are the ones when I go shopping. Don’t make your fingers do the walking (an old slogan that transfers easily form the yellow pages to the keyboard). Walking, regular walking, is one of the healthiest ways to control or even lose weight. It doesn’t require equipment or a personal trainer or a class (although exercise classes can provide a social outlet as you emerge from hibernation). Just download a free app on your iPhone and start counting your steps.

Your presence in stores also boosts the local retail establishment, which is good for the local economy. Yes, online shopping is great for finding obscure things, like a replacement flag for your mailbox, but local stores and services create jobs pay taxes and support high school teams and lots of other good community endeavors. Retailers and service provides have had a tough 14 months, and the survivors need your patronage.

Stand strong for America! Get up, get moving, and go shopping!

A Torrent of Holidays

February usual begins quietly with Groundhog Day on the 2n,, pauses for Superbowl Sunday,  then cruises on through  Valentine’s Day on the 14th, Presidents’ Day on the third Monday, and Mardi Gras and Ash Wednesday, which fall sometimes in February and sometimes in early March depending on the phases of the moon.  This year we experienced  a confluence of holidays, each calling for a different emotional attitude, as there were four holidays in a row on the 14th, 15th, 16th, and 17th.  Unlike the Christmas holidays, each called for a different kind of emotional response.  Valentine’s Day is lighthearted and sentimental, hearts and chocolates and flowers and cards.   Presidents’ Day invites us to be patriotic, closing the banks and the Post Office and in many places, the schools.  There is also the invitation to shop at the Presidents’ Day sales, spending some of that green stuff with presidential pictures on the front.   Mardi Gras is the final celebratory fling (the carnival, literally meaning farewell to meat) before Ash Wednesday calls observant Christians to the austere penitential six weeks of Lent.( Even those of us whose faith traditions didn’t make a big deal out of Lent felt compelled growing up to join our  more high church comrades in giving something up for Lent. Nothing like a holiday the celebrates self-denial.) By Thursday al of us will be in for a good rest with no significant holidays till Saint Patrick’s Day a month later. Whew!

All of these holidays have an interpersonal aspect in their observances that don’t work well with a pandemic, even one that is starting to recede.  Valentine’s Day is for hugs and kisses and exchanging cards—maybe not in a pandemic.  Presidents’ Day means the kids are out of school and some of the parents off work, which might mean some playtime or family time or a weekend adventure somewhere.  Not during a pandemic.  Mardi Gras is observed in various ways ranging from church pancake suppoers to a party or a trip to New Orleans—not during a pandemic.  Even the imposition of ashes on Ash Wednesday is hard for churches to manage during a pandemic.  At least the pandemic can’t mess with Lent, since this season of austerity  has come during a time when we are already being asked to practice self-denial—what’s another six weeks of it?

All of these holidays have a common element, however, and that element is hope.  Valentine’s Day was originally a Roman fertility holiday. The name of the month, February, refers to the fever of love. The earth is preparing to be bloom again and humans are willing to go along with it by celebrating romantic love, even if it is only by watching Bridgerton on Netflix. Renewal of plant and animal life as we all start to emerge from winter’s hibernation is a source of hope.  As the weather warms, even those of us practicing social distancing can do more of it outdoors and see other humans as more than a head in a rectangle on Zoom.

With the inauguration of a new president and political tempers cooling after the post-election drama, there is also a renewal of hope that perhaps we can learn to dwell together in peace, a good thought for Presidents’ Day. I just heard the statistic that politically speaking, 25% of Americans are Republicans, 25% are Democrats, and 50% are Independents.  There actually is a majority—it’s the No Party Party!  Perhaps efforts to woo those independents will pull both parties back toward the center.

Finally, Mardi Gras is about letting go, turning one’s back on self-indulgence after one last fling and instead make an effort at cultivating the spirit. (In medieval times, it was also a way to stretch the food supply in the final months before spring crops began to come in.) It is long enough to change, short enough to see the light of Easter at the end of the Lenten tunnel, with the hope that by Ester, the holiday of renewal and rebirth, we will be reborn as better, wiser, more patient and less greedy and gluttonous than we were six weeks ago.  That’s a tall order, but we have to start somewhere.

So as we zip through these back to back holidays, let us celebrate hope.  Especially the hope that we have actually learned something from the pandemic and will remember it next year when these last gasp of winter/start of sprig holidays come round again.